White Oaks are found in the forest areas and along the boundaries of the park also do not let the color of the  bark fool you. Look close it could be a Chinkapin Oak, they are also in the woods, the leaves are quite differ, see below to identify the Chinkapin Oak.

White Oak, Quercus alba L.

Fagaceae -- Beech family

Robert Rogers

 

White oak (Quercus alba) is an outstanding tree among all trees and is widespread across eastern North America. The most important lumber tree of the white oak group, growth is good on all but the driest shallow soils. Its high-grade wood is useful for many things, an important one being staves for barrels, hence the name stave oak. The acorns are an important food for many kinds of wildlife.

Habitat

 

Native Range

White oak grows throughout most of the Eastern United States. It is found from southwestern Maine and extreme southern Quebec, west to southern Ontario, central Michigan, to southeastern Minnesota; south to western Iowa, eastern Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas; east to northern Florida and Georgia. The tree is generally absent in the high Appalachians, in the Delta region of the lower Mississippi, and in the coastal areas of Texas and Louisiana.

The west slopes of the Appalachian Mountains and the Ohio and central Mississippi River Valleys have optimum conditions for white oak, but the largest trees have been found in Delaware and Maryland on the Eastern Shore.

Special Uses

Acorns are a valuable though inconsistent source of wildlife food. More than 180 different kinds of birds and mammals use oak acorns as food; among them are squirrels, blue jays, crows, red-headed woodpeckers, deer, turkey, quail, mice, chipmunks, ducks, and raccoons. White oak twigs and foliage are browsed by deer especially in clearcuts less than 6 years old.

White oak is sometimes planted as an ornamental tree because of its broad round crown, dense foliage, and purplish-red to violet-purple fall coloration. It is less favored than red oak because it is difficult to transplant and has a slow growth rate.

Chinkapin Oak, Quercus muehlenbergii Engelm.

 

Fagaceae -- Beech family

Ivan L. Sander

Chinkapin oak (Quercus muehlenbergii), sometimes called yellow chestnut oak, rock oak, or yellow oak, grows in alkaline soils on limestone outcrops and well-drained slopes of the uplands, usually with other hardwoods. It seldom grows in size or abundance to be commercially important, but the heavy wood makes excellent fuel. The acorns are sweet and are eaten by several kinds of animals and birds.

Habitat

Native Range

Chinkapin oak is found in western Vermont and New York, west to southern Ontario, southern Michigan, southern Wisconsin, extreme southeastern Minnesota, and Iowa; south to southeastern Nebraska, eastern Kansas, western Oklahoma, and central Texas; east to northwest Florida; and north mostly in the mountains to Pennsylvania and southwestern Massachusetts. There are local populations in the mountains of southeastern New Mexico, Trans-Pecos Texas, and northeastern Mexico.

Special Uses

Chinkapin oak acorns are sweet and palatable and are eaten by squirrels, mice, voles, chipmunks, deer, turkey, and other birds. Acorns may be taken from the tree or from the ground. Because trees are scattered, chinkapin oak acorns are an important source of food only to the extent the contribute to the total mast available.

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